Starting up is hard to do

StartUp worksspace
Why StartUps need a proper desk

I think it was Neil Sedaka who said starting up is hard to do. Or was that breaking up? I’ll assume for the sake of this post he was talking about a tough StartUp he’d been involved with. Because starting up is hard…but in a good way.

After the coziness of salaried employment I’m sat here at my new (temporary) desk. Kind of alone. But then again, no politics, no power plays, no sulking. Other than my own. And being alone teaches you a hell of lot.

I know it’s obvious but because you’re alone you play all the roles. An old friend of mine started his own thing, just him, all alone. But he’d literally play all the roles. He’d answer the phone and say ‘I’ll see if he’s free’…even the client’s joined in: ‘would you like to take that back to the office and talk it through’. I think they liked him so much they wanted to – subconsciously at least – give him the respect of being a ‘proper’ company.

So I’m on my own and doing everything. It’s not like I’ve never done this before. I’ve been involved in three stand alone attempted StartUps and three within an existing business (still counts in a way). But there was always a team from the off. Now I am the team and there’s loads to do, much of which I’ve never done before.

Now, if you’re not familiar with Comfort Zone Theory, there are three stages as I was taught it:
1. Comfort
2. Stretch
3. Break

A few days ago, I was talking to a guy who has a great little StartUp, already operating, already proven. They’ve done a great job but he is pretty much petrified about visible marketing/PR, the stuff where they have to be seen to say something and even perhaps show a face, rather than SEO etc. SO he keeps putting it off.

In a StartUp you’re constantly being pulled out of your comfort zone, having to learn new stuff, both hard & soft skills. We all have to develop new coping mechanisms to make sure we stay in the Stretch Zone and don’t slip into Break Zone. After we got him to drink more beer I think he began to relax.

Hell, I’m even trying to learn some coding…I thought it was going well until I pressed save and nothing happened. That was at midnight. But at least I got my ‘beta’ site up and running, for now just something that I hope proves to the local authorities that I’m serious about this business and I’m not hear to sponge (on what exactly?! It’s costing me an arm & a leg to stay here with no income!). I’ll talk about the website development in a subsequent post.

Also – and this feels symbolically significant – I took on some pay-as-you-go office space at Collective Works. Having a workspace away from the kitchen table at home is good. But perhaps it’s greater value is the network effect. Normally, in an office, it just happens but not now. The stuff I’m confortable with is the product development, the business plans, the website and the content dev etc. etc…as valuable as these are though, I’m beginning to suspect that the network is going to be at least as important. And guess what, I’ve been rubbish at it. (I’m in good company: check this great piece on this from the excellent James Altucher.)

However, in pay-as-you-go space people don’t really talk to each other. What I’ve come to realise is that I need to get out of my comfort zone and force a network, I need to be proactive and make it happen. Now I’m asking pretty much anyone and everyone out for a coffee/drink. So this is going to be interesting…can I carry it off? So far it’s going OK and I’ve realised that:
1. You need people to bounce stuff off. Two brains are better than one. And other StartUp types love to help out, it’s in their blood.
2. Despite not working together, you, effectively, pool your skills. They teach me about SEO, I teach them about brand development.
3. You are energised by all these other StartUps trying to make it happen. That gives you momentum/ a kick when you need it.
4. Someone always knows someone else you should meet. So within a matter of weeks you have a network you can barely keep up with.

So the lesson for any StartUp is to force a network: get some office space, ask people out for a drink, email people you’ve never met, ask Person A if they can introduce you to Person B, sit in the right bar at the right time. Look it might not be the golden key but it’s got to improve your chances.

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